w-h-a-t-s g-o-i-n-g o-n

January 2020: Check out this brilliant write-up by BA Magazine and Journalism student Afra Al Majed of a panel debate I chaired on the importance and pros and cons of portfolio practice. The panel debate took place in October 2019 and was part of Creative Start-Up Day coordinated by UAL Careers and Employability.





Want to know more about building a portfolio as a creative? We’re doing a throwback to our Portfolio Practice workshop at Creative Start-Up Day, where we learnt all about how to balance all of your projects.

The Portfolio practice talk featured two guests, Halime Özdemir, a visual arts director and producer, and Shannon Bono, an art curator and cultural writer.

For those who don’t know what portfolio practice is, our chair Sophie Risner from Arts SU described it as “simply being you.” Portfolio practice basically means doing a few different things to earn a living.

August 2019: Head over to the Writing section of my website for a text responding to Frances Scott and Chu-Li Chewring’s collaborative audio piece ‘Incantation, Wendy’ - online 

Can we relinquish music and by default sound from the terrain it first negotiated? Can we split its referential abilities and find a new meaning and emotion within its landscape? and unjustly encountered is there space for it to grow apart from its own historical residue? Frances Scott and Chu-Li Shewring’s ‘Incantation, Wendy’ (2018) revokes sound’s complex necessity to stick to subject matter - it questions what happens when we remove sound from its previous memory and, like a ritual - grow it another form.

March 2019: I reviewed Libita Clayton’s first UK solo-show ‘Quantum Ghost’ at Gasworks - online



The ability for this work to both move and haunt the viewer proves the nuance of the weight borne not just by Clayton and her family but by a greater movement of individuals whose voices have been lost in the transaction played out between sites of colonial excavation and diasporic migration. As such Clayton proves the potency of history lies not just in the navigation of the past but its proximity to the present.

Read online here over at ‘This is Tomorrow’

Image: Andy Keate 


November 2018: I reviewed Gran Fury’s retrospective show ‘Read My Lips’ at Auto Italia South East - online


In the first room the large-scale poster and accompanying video ‘Kissing Doesn’t Kill: Greed and Indifference Do’ (1989) could possibly be considered one of the first truly intersectional contemporary works of art. Several different couples kissing, some pecking one another coyly, some provocatively engaging in snogs full of longing, others deep throating - tongues darting and saliva engulfing like it’s their first pash on a sweaty dance floor - a symbolic salute to the emancipation of sexuality that was drastically and violently withdrawn from the gay community upon the outbreak of HIV. It’s a piece full of lusty, flirty necessity underscoring the trauma of HIV in which physical intimacy, an act we hold the dearest to our connection with one another, becomes a political bargaining chip.

Read online here over at This is Tomorrow.
Image: Kissing Does Kill (detail), Gran Fury 1990, vinyl wall poster / http://autoitaliasoutheast.org/project/gran-fury-read-my-lips/ All images courtesy of Gran Fury and Auto Italia. Photography by Original&theCopy


September 2018: A Selection of Fragments - Libby Leshgold Gallery, Vancouver



We printed off Nante to include in our Selection of Fragments which launched on Saturday as the result of a one week residency in Vancouver. We compiled mystery bags for visitors from a selection of around 35 pamphlets, broadsheets, posters and publications.
Hi Sophie,

I hope you are well, greetings from Vancouver where I am currently working with our sibling Publication Studio!

Kay Higgins (PS Vancouver), Patrick Kiley (PS New York) and I invite you to share a fragment of your work for a folio currently under improvisation, to be published at Publication Studio Vancouver on Saturday, September 15.

Our public potluck will render selections of your unfinished, uncollected, fragmentary, vague or otherwise orphaned pieces of writing, reading, art, archival research or stray memory. The miscellaneous spread of items that results from this call will in turn be gathered together during our event and later circulated back to you in a packet or envelope.

We hope to hear from you and are grateful for your submission!

Louisa x


August 2018: Women of Westminster Exploring hersory with The Feminist Library - The Showroom Gallery


Photo: Eva Megias 

I worked with Graphic Designer Eva Megias and artist Emma Thatcher to contribute a text reflecting on the actor Hannah Pritchard whose memorial in Poet’s Corner, Westminster Abbey was removed to make way for that of Dr. Samual Johnson 
Material from the Feminist Library's collection and local archives will be used to provide inspiration and teach about the history of self-publishing.

The group will work towards creating a small-press publicatio reflecting lives of women in the area, past and present. The resulting work will be put together in a publication to be produced by risograph printing, a process traditionally implemented in self-and art-publishing.

Copies of the publication will be given to the participants. They will also remain for public use in Church St Library, The Showroom Library, The Feminist Library and Bishopsgate Institute.